VIEWPOINTS 4: Our thoughts on the 2017 UK general election.

Its been a long election. At BTH we aim to analyse, discuss and explore the aim, agenda, and bias of international, national and local newspapers to as many members of the public as possible. Still, each of our writers bring their own opinions and biases in the work that we do, in our analysis, and how we interpret the news. This invariably affects the work we produce, and so in the name of full transparency, today we give you a glimpse of our opinions and worldviews.

Last, but not least, we bring you the thoughts of Bruno Gnaneswaran, a co-founder of Between the Headlines.

I have been unable to vote in the last three general elections despite desperately wanting to and having the urge to. I want to be involved in the democratic process that will have huge consequences on my life and the life of others. Our current society is crying for change. In order to have real change, in order to have a truly representative parliament and government, we need to have a serious discussion on our out-dated first-past-the-post voting system. The current voting system is not fair, undemocratic and ensures that not all votes count equally. During the last general election, 74% of our votes were wasted and did not make a difference to the outcome. Every vote should count equally.
The media has a significant influence on this democratic process and here at BTH we believe that although the media is incredibly important, it needs to be held accountable when it is not delivering reliable, accurate and truly representative journalism. My personal ideologies and policies are not in line with the Conservatives and I am very pleased to see the right-wing media, despite its strong efforts, has not stopped Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour manifesto to show what policies are needed to help fight social injustice. Britain is the fifth largest economy in the world and instead of helping those who are already wealthy, lets have a government and society that helps those who are vulnerable and provides equal opportunities for all. Lets have a better education system for our children, a functioning health and social care system and adequate policing to keep us safe.
This was a nasty, individualistic and chaotic campaign run by Theresa May and we need to remind those that represent us that this is not what we ask of our politicians. Today, the people have made their voices heard – this is not what we want from our leaders. We do not care about personalities, we care about policies. We want politicians that want to help fight the serious inequalities that exists here in the U.K. and throughout the world. Today has shown us there is a momentum and a wish for a more equal, just and compassionate society.
We hope you’ve enjoyed this special edition. Next week we return to our analysis newspaper headlines.
We always welcome new writers, so drop us an e-mail if you are interested in joining our team.

VIEWPOINTS 3: Our thoughts on the 2017 UK general election

Its been a long election. At BTH we aim to analyse, discuss and explore the aim, agenda, and bias of international, national and local newspapers to as many members of the public as possible. Still, each of our writers bring their own opinions and biases in the work that we do, in our analysis, and how we interpret the news. This invariably affects the work we produce, and so in the name of full transparency, today we give you a glimpse of our opinions and worldviews.

Below we bring you the thoughts of Alice Edwards, one of the co-founders of Between the Headlines.

I have voted both Labour and Green over the years, am a supporter of the concept of a Progressive Alliance on the left. Considering the impact of the media on this general election, there’s one point that cannot go ignored: print press is not where it’s at. Despite acknowledging the media bias against Corbyn with the infamous ‘Don’t chuck Britain in the Cor Bin’ and the London Evening Standard (current editor: George Osbourne) ever-detached from real Londoners and their politics, coming out in blunt support of the Conservatives saying they were “best for our capital.” However, despite this coverage, Corbyn still did unexpectedly well. I feel that the significant growth in youth vote and Corbyn’s success indicates that it’s the freedom provided of online politics – whether it be through memes and Corbyn’s dabbing or it’s use in organising and mobilising a big part of the electorate – was what got people interested.

VIEWPOINTS 2: Our thoughts on the 2017 UK general election

Its been a long election. At BTH we aim to analyse, discuss and explore the aim, agenda, and bias of international, national and local newspapers to as many members of the public as possible. Still, each of our writers bring their own opinions and biases in the work that we do, in our analysis, and how we interpret the news. This invariably affects the work we produce, and so in the name of full transparency, today we give you a glimpse of our opinions and worldviews.

Next up in our exclusive Between the Headlines series is Samuel Hewitt.

I voted Labour yesterday because I believe they offered the hope of a government that put people and compassion first, above private interest and capital. While I was initially sceptical of Jeremy Corbyn’s ability to rise above a media that is inherently rightwing and appeal to a wide range of UK voters, I have always agreed with his policies. And I am pleasantly surprised that his and Labour’s tactics have seemed to worked magnificently, using social media and grassroots campaigns to harness the hope and power of the youth vote, along with those who are disenfranchised with the current political structure.

Labour may not have gained enough seats to form a government but this election was about so much more, and it showed that there really is an appetite for social justice in the UK. The Conservatives tried to run on a platform of individual interest, of fear and concern over ‘the other side’ and although they now form a government they do so in a much weakened position.

As a medical student who will likely move directly into a position of near total job security, adequate pay, and ample opportunities in the private sector, it is not me who will stand to lose the most with a Conservative government. I think its important for people in a similar position to consider what type of society we want to live in moving forward – do we want one where public services and social care are cut because of the long discredited phantom of ‘austerity’, leading to over 30,000 deaths a year because the Tories prefer to give tax cuts to the banks and wealthy businesses? One where, for all their talk of economic proficiency and the failings of the opposition, the national debt has tripled in 7 years and the Tories are now on the brink of forming a coalition government with a party that is anti-abortion and gay rights, are climate sceptics and have direct links with terrorist groups? Or do we want one where people have access to universal health care, access to essential services like carers and a winter fuel allowance? Where we understand that the economy isn’t like our bank account and by cutting spending drastically we actually starve the economy and weaken it? One where we take care of the many, and not just the few? I know which one I prefer.

VIEWPOINTS: Our thoughts on the 2017 UK General election.

Its been a long election. At BTH we aim to analyse, discuss and explore the aim, agenda, and bias of international, national and local newspapers to as many members of the public as possible. Still, each of our writers bring their own opinions and biases in the work that we do, in our analysis, and how we interpret the news. This invariably affects the work we produce, and so in the name of full transparency, today we give you a glimpse of our opinions and worldviews.

To start it all off is Anjali Menezes, a non-UK, non-EU national, studying in the UK for the past 5 years on a student visa.

As a Canadian citizen, and an international student in the UK on a student visa, I have an outsider’s view on the UK general election. Did I vote? No. Could I have voted? Yes.

As a common wealth citizen living in the UK I could have voted in this election, and I am not entirely proud that I did not. Voting is an incredible privilege that I gave up last night. I voted in the 2015 UK general election, and just a few months later I also voted in the Canadian 2015 general election. To be honest, I felt a bit like a fraud. UK citizens do not have the right to vote in Canadian elections, so the right of common wealth citizens to vote in the UK is not reciprocated. I voted with my own ideals in the UK election, but I honestly do not have a vested interest in the UK. I am Canadian and hope to return to my home country very soon.

I have a significant bias and conflict of interest here. International tuition fees are immense, and my true hope is that the pound will fall. In both Canada and the UK, my political views are strongly anti-conservative, so even though I did not vote,  I am upset that the Labour Party did not win last night. However, I am pleased that there was no Conservative majority.